3 Things That Usually Go Wrong With Hydraulic Engines

3 Things That Usually Go Wrong With Hydraulic Engines

The use of hydraulic power has changed the efficiency of industries ranging from farming to manufacturing. The power behind the somewhat simple design of pressurized fluid helps get more work done in less time, but with mechanics that can be easily cleaned or repaired. However, if you don’t take care of your system, you will face long-term struggles with performance and expensive replacement. Here are the top three areas where things commonly go wrong in hydraulics.

1. Changing the Oil

There are usually two things that will require an oil change in your hydraulic systems: depletion of an additive and the degradation of the base oil. There are also things that can affect your oil reserves, like leaks or the hours of service and run time. However, the best way to assess if the time is right for a change through oil analysis. Don’t just take a guess, as oil can be costly.

2. Changing the Filters

Like the air filters on your car, the filters on your system will need to be changed to ensure contaminating particles don’t make it through into the ail. There is a caution against changing them too early or too late. The optimal time for change is when the capacity for dirt-holding has been maximized, but the bypass valve has not yet opened. Monitor how the pressure drops across the filter for a clue on when it’s okay to change.

3. Running Too Hot

If you continue to operate an engine that is overheating, you will burn out your engine components longs before their time. The hydraulic seals, hoses, and the oil are all quickly destroyed when used during high-temperature operations. The level of acceptable heat will depend on the type of oil and the nature of the components your system has.

If you aren’t careful, you can destroy the efficiency of your hydraulic engine. Don’t avoid these three areas of routine maintenance.